5 ways to improve the ROI on Talent Management

25/11/2011 at 15:27 2 comments

Lets face it – most companies don’t measure ROI on their Talent Management programs. Perhaps this is because they don’t know how to, that they know the result will be scary (very negative) or just because they don’t believe in measuring HR. For whatever reason, they are starting from way behind the starting line.

ROI is a simple tool – and also a tool to be used carefully as it has many pitfalls. However, at is core it has two components; benefits and costs. To improve ROI you need to focus on both. These five suggestions will improve your ROI by looking at how to improve the benefits (4 & 5) and how to lower the costs (1, 2 & 3).

  1. Improve your development program. You can create value by finding ways to lower the cost of your development program associated with the talent program without affecting the benefit of the program. This can successfully be done using e-learning, coaching and action learning which all have significant lower costs than big  classroom-based learning programs. While no program should be based solely on any of the above mentioned, the cost of most programs can be lowered without compromising the benefits using these types of components.
  2. Shorten your program. Going back in the 60’s it was not unusual to find talent programs which had a duration of three years or even more. This has proved to be wasteful for two reasons; firstly, the uncertainty of forecast of talent needs are too high over such a period. You end up with more talent or competencies you don’t need – and that is a serious waste of money. The second reason is that the added benefits of the final year has proved to be lower than its costs. It is simply not worth it. Best to keep programs at a length of 1½ years instead.
  3. Create more effective assessment centers (AC’s). AC’s are used to select and develop talent. AC has been under a lot of pressure for two reasons; the validity is often very low and they cost a lot. While both issues are real it is possible to make AC’s valid and cost effective. The difference in ROI between a standard AC and a best practice AC is significant. Make the effort to make a good one.
  4. Add external candidates to your program. Fact is that you will not have enough talent in-house to meet your need for growth and innovation. Instead of spending good money on people who will not be able to develop at the required speed or achieving the right level of competencies you should acquire them from outside. This is cheaper and earns a better return.
  5. Have a plan for what happens after the program. The single biggest reason for why talents leave after having been through a talent program is that they are frustrated of not getting moved up in the organization or being offered better projects to work on after the program. This must be addressed up front. Studies suggest that the talent turnover can be halved post the program if proper post-program plans are in place.

The first step is however to measure your return on your Talent Management program. This is not difficult, but requires a solid process based upon best practice. Once this has been done then you can find ways to improve your return. The above five categories will get you a long way.

Good luck.

Entry filed under: Talent Management. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , .

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